Difference between pages "CAcert" and "Tutorials/Python 3: Making the Leap!"

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CAcert is a community driven Certificate autority.
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On Wednesday at 10:40 in the Robert Street Lecture Theatre I will be running a tutorial on porting code written for python 2 to work in python 3.
The idea is to provide ssl certificates to the public without cost.
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Please see [http://www.cacert.org/ cacert.org] for more information.
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This session will be live and interactive, so to get the most out of the tutorial, please bring along a laptop and be ready to hack.
  
Trust is built by face to face meetings where a trusted member an "Assurer" will certify id documents to verify identity.
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== What will be covered? ==
An assurer is someone that has had thair documents assured by at least 3 people and have been awarded enough points.
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Please provide the best photo id you have possible.
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Getting code to run on python 3 is a *massive* topic, and we could spend an entire week looking at it and not cover everything. As we only have 100 minutes we will only cover a relatively small, but IMHO important, subset of the topic. In particular, we will look at.
  
== What You will need ==
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* How to get code which currently runs under 2.7 to run under 3.3 (without maintaining 2.7 backwards compatibility).
An account on http://www.cacert.org/
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* How to modify your 2.7 code to be as close to 3.3 compatible as possible.
When creating the account your name must match your id.
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* How to use different tools to automate the porting process.
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* Common gotchas with the automated tools which may require manual intervention
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* Strategies for using all the different tools and techniques to make the porting process as simple as possible.
  
If your account contains your first, middle and last name your id must also contain your first middle and last name.
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We unfortunately won't be able to cover some interesting topics, including
Passports are preferred, Drivers Licence is also ok, your student id is not.
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Please add yourself to the below if you want to be assured or are able to assure someone.
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* How to get code to run under python 2 and 3 simultaneously.
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* How to port python extension modules.
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* How to use brand new features which have been introduced in python 3.
  
== I am happy to assure someone ==
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The session will cater to a fairly broad range of abilities. If you're a python newbie, you should be able to keep up with everything. If you're a python guru you might just learn something new (I know I did while preparing the session!).
* [[User:Daniel_sobey|Daniel Sobey]]
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== I would like to be assured ==
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== What to bring ==
* [[User:Phillip Smith|Phillip Smith]]
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* A laptop with python 2 and python 3 installed.
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* A shell and text editor.
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* Any python code which you'd like help porting form 2 to 3.
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* The example code from github: https://github.com/timleslie/LCA_py2to3
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All examples are platform agnostic and should work on linux/osx/windows.
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== What to do ==
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* Turn up :-)
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* Follow along with all the examples.
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* Try out the techniques on your code as we go.
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* Ask questions if you would like clarification...
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* ... but understand that the answer might be "that's beyond the scope of this session, come and chat with me later".
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I look forward to seeing you all for a fun and interesting session.
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@timl

Revision as of 18:12, 7 January 2014

On Wednesday at 10:40 in the Robert Street Lecture Theatre I will be running a tutorial on porting code written for python 2 to work in python 3.

This session will be live and interactive, so to get the most out of the tutorial, please bring along a laptop and be ready to hack.

What will be covered?

Getting code to run on python 3 is a *massive* topic, and we could spend an entire week looking at it and not cover everything. As we only have 100 minutes we will only cover a relatively small, but IMHO important, subset of the topic. In particular, we will look at.

  • How to get code which currently runs under 2.7 to run under 3.3 (without maintaining 2.7 backwards compatibility).
  • How to modify your 2.7 code to be as close to 3.3 compatible as possible.
  • How to use different tools to automate the porting process.
  • Common gotchas with the automated tools which may require manual intervention
  • Strategies for using all the different tools and techniques to make the porting process as simple as possible.

We unfortunately won't be able to cover some interesting topics, including

  • How to get code to run under python 2 and 3 simultaneously.
  • How to port python extension modules.
  • How to use brand new features which have been introduced in python 3.

The session will cater to a fairly broad range of abilities. If you're a python newbie, you should be able to keep up with everything. If you're a python guru you might just learn something new (I know I did while preparing the session!).

What to bring

  • A laptop with python 2 and python 3 installed.
  • A shell and text editor.
  • Any python code which you'd like help porting form 2 to 3.
  • The example code from github: https://github.com/timleslie/LCA_py2to3

All examples are platform agnostic and should work on linux/osx/windows.

What to do

  • Turn up :-)
  • Follow along with all the examples.
  • Try out the techniques on your code as we go.
  • Ask questions if you would like clarification...
  • ... but understand that the answer might be "that's beyond the scope of this session, come and chat with me later".

I look forward to seeing you all for a fun and interesting session.

@timl